WHAT IS CLOUD SEEDING AND HOW DOES IT WORK?

Nowadays, internet speeds are reaching an all-time high compared to previous iterations (think dial-up connections) with the world speed record for a fiber network pushing,  255 Terabits per second in a single strand of fiber optic cable. Imagine downloading one HD movie with that kind of speed, “Wait I will download Marvel Infinity Wars ……… done.” These has all been made possible by joint effort between researchers from Netherlands and US using experimental equipment and cladding multiple fiber core together. Unfortunately, this is purely for research purpose conducted in a lab environment. As of now, the commercially available internet speed reaches up to 10 Gbps which is more than enough for the typical business to run on. However, some companies utilize a lot of data ranging from terrabytes (1012 ) up to exabytes (1018 ). To help resolve this issue, cloud storage services company provide cloud seeding – a service where a physical drive or storage appliance is sent to the customer – in order for them to back up their data locally and ship the data back to the provider company.

Even big cloud hosting companies with their terrabytes of internet speed, are not immune to this hurdle. One such example is Amazon Web Services (AWS). They have a lot of clients storing exabytes of data like big media company Netflix and Digital Globe where traditional 10 Gbps link won’t be enough to provide their services to end users. This is precisely the reason Amazon introduced AWS snowmobile, a literal 45 foot long truck to fetch the data from customer physical on-premise infrastructure and deliver it to their data centers. Amazon estimates than an exabyte of data will reach 26 years in a 10 Gbps dedicated connection with the AWS snowmobile it only takes a little under 6 months.

Without a doubt, technology has evolved these past years however to really transfer massive amounts of data to the cloud, having that physical truck to fetch tremendous amount of data is still the go to solution. Now, that is a sweet truck!

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